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Sunday, December 9 in Elementary KidzTown

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Once again, we are going to break from our chronological journey through the Bible to celebrate Jesus’ birth at Christmas. Jesus’ birth is God’s solution to our sin problem. When Adam and Eve introduced sin into the world, all of creation fell under a curse. (See Gen. 3:17-19.) We all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God. We’ve inherited the curse of death from Adam. (See Rom. 3:23; 5:12.) 

Throughout the Old Testament, the consequences of sin are obvious. God’s people were separated from Him; they did not enjoy the intimate relationship with their Creator they were created to have. God’s people were affected by sickness and pain. The situation seemed hopeless, yet God did not leave His people without hope. Hundreds of messages came through the prophets concerning a coming Messiah—One who would rescue people from their sins. But when would this Promised One come? How would He come? Would the people recognize Him?

The prophets Isaiah and Micah—who both lived hundreds of years before Jesus was born—spoke specifically of the Messiah’s birth. Isaiah told King Ahaz what the Lord would do. “The virgin will conceive, have a son, and name him Immanuel” (Isa. 7:14). He described the birth of a Prince of Peace—a Son of David who will reign forever. (Isa. 9:6-7) Isaiah said that He would be a King! (Isa. 11:1-5) The prophet Micah named the specific town—Bethlehem—in which Jesus would be born. (Mic. 5:2)

God’s plan to save people from sin and death was not a secret plan. God used the prophets to give hope to His people. They said God would send a Messiah—born into the world as a baby to live the perfect life people fail to live and die the guilty death we deserve. Though death came through Adam, life comes through Christ. (1 Cor. 15:22) Through His death on the cross, Jesus finished the work for our salvation. In Him lies our hope of forgiveness and eternal life.

Family Activity: 

Take a coin and invite a family member to guess whether it will land on heads or tails as you flip it into the air. If the family member guesses correctly, allow him to guess again. His turn ends when he guesses incorrectly. After each family member’s turn, see who guessed correctly the most times. Write the results below. Talk about how we can only guess about what is going to happen in the future, but God never has to guess. Everything God told His prophets about Jesus’ birth happened.

 

Posted by Erin Krotz with

Sunday, November 18 in Elementary KidzTown

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In His covenant with Abraham, God promised land, descendants, and a blessing to all the nations of the earth. (Gen. 22:17-18) God would keep His promise through every generation, choosing one person to carry the line until one day, a child would be born into the family who would be the promised One. God reaffirmed the promise to Abraham’s son Isaac. Isaac was the next child chosen to carry the family line.

After 20 years of marriage, Isaac and Rebekah still did not have children. Isaac prayed that God would give Rebekah a child, and God answered his prayer. Rebekah became pregnant with twins, but the pregnancy was difficult. The twins fought inside her, and Rebekah asked God, “Why is this happening to me?”

God explained His plan for the twins. The boys’ families would become two nations (from Esau, the nation of Edom; from Jacob, the nation of Israel), one stronger than the other. And the older son would serve the younger. This was uncommon; the firstborn had a birthright—a double portion of the inheritance. But this prophecy showed God had chosen the younger twin to inherit the promise made to Abraham.

Jacob and Rebekah’s boys were born and the older, Esau (EE saw), was unlike the younger, Jacob. Esau became a hunter, and Jacob stayed at home. One day, Esau agreed to give his birthright to Jacob in exchange for some bread and a bowl of stew.

Isaac may have perceived the conflict between brothers as a threat to the covenant. But God appeared to Isaac at Gerar reaffirmed His promise of land, descendants, and a blessing to all the nations of the earth. (Gen. 26:4) He encouraged Isaac to be faithful like Abraham. God was at work in each generation. He showed grace by extending the promise to those who had no innate right to it, to those who did not deserve it.

As you share this story with your kids, remind them that God’s covenant with Abraham continued to the next generation. Esau sold his birthright, giving Jacob the right to the wonderful blessings God promised to his father Abraham. Through Jacob’s family, God would send the promised Savior to bring blessing and salvation to the world.

FAMILY ACTIVITY

Contact a family in your church or community who has a newborn baby. Schedule a time for your family to meet the baby. Discuss how God’s family grows as people trust Jesus and are “born again.”

FAMILY DISCUSSION STARTERS

• What is a birthright, and why was it important?

• Why do you think God reminded Isaac of His promise?

• What do believers in Jesus inherit as a “birthright”? (See Gal. 3:29; Heb. 11:16; Titus 3:7.)

Posted by Erin Krotz with

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