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Sunday December 3 in Elementary KidzTown

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Key Passage: Isaiah 9:6

Big Picture Question: How many prophecies about Jesus’ birth actually happened? Everything God said about Jesus’ birth came true.

Christ Connection: God’s plan to save people from sin and death was not a secret plan. God used the prophets to give hope to His people. They said God would send a Messiah—born into the world as a baby to live the perfect life people fail to live and die the guilty death we deserve.

Dear Parents,

Thank you for continuing this journey of The Gospel Project® for Kids. Once again, we are going to break from our chronological journey through the Bible to celebrate Jesus’ birth at Christmas. Jesus’ birth is God’s solution to our sin problem. When Adam and Eve introduced sin into the world, all of creation fell under a curse. (See Gen. 3:17-19.) We all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God. We’ve inherited the curse of death from Adam. (See Rom. 3:23; 5:12.)

Throughout the Old Testament, the consequences of sin are obvious. God’s people were separated from Him; they did not enjoy the intimate relationship with their Creator they were created to have. God’s people were affected by sickness and pain. The situation seemed hopeless, yet God did not leave His people without hope. Hundreds of messages came through the prophets concerning a coming Messiah—One who would rescue people from their sins. But when would this Promised One come? How would He come? Would the people recognize Him?

The prophets Isaiah and Micah—who both lived hundreds of years before Jesus was born—spoke specifically of the Messiah’s birth. Isaiah told King Ahaz what the Lord would do. “The virgin will conceive, have a son, and name him Immanuel” (Isa. 7:14). He described the birth of a Prince of Peace—a Son of David who will reign forever. (Isa. 9:6-7) Isaiah said that He would be a King! (Isa. 11:1-5) The prophet Micah named the specific town—Bethlehem—in which Jesus would be born. (Mic. 5:2)

God’s plan to save people from sin and death was not a secret plan. God used the prophets to give hope to His people. They said God would send a Messiah—born into the world as a baby to live the perfect life people fail to live and die the guilty death we deserve. Though death came through Adam, life comes through Christ. (1 Cor. 15:22) Through His death on the cross, Jesus finished the work for our salvation. In Him lies our hope of forgiveness and eternal life.

Activity: Take a coin and invite a family member to guess whether it will land on heads or tails as you ip it into the air. If the family member guesses correctly, allow him to guess again. His turn ends when he guesses incorrectly. After each family member’s turn, see who guessed correctly the most times. Write the results below. Talk about how we can only guess about what is going to happen in the future, but God never has to guess. Everything God told His prophets about Jesus’ birth happened.

Posted by Erin Krotz with

Sunday November 19 in Elementary KidzTown

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Key Passage: Luke 18:31

Big Picture Question: Was Jesus wrong to be angry? No, Jesus was angry for the right reasons. Jesus hates sin.

Christ Connection: Jesus was angry that people were misusing the temple, the place people could go to meet with God. Today, Christians do not go to a temple to meet with God or to offer sacrifices for sin. Jesus died on the cross as the nal payment for sin, and God’s Spirit lives in us.

Dear Parents,

Thank you for continuing this journey of The Gospel Project® for Kids. This week’s Bible story comes from Matthew 21:12-17; Mark 11:15-19; and Luke 19:45-48.

In preparation for the Passover feast, Jesus made His triumphal entry into Jerusalem. The Books of Matthew, Mark, and Luke also describe Jesus’ cleansing of the temple. Herod the Great completely rebuilt the temple in 20–18 B.C. as part of his architectural projects. Herod’s temple was surrounded by walls and gates, with specific places for Gentiles, women, and men to worship God and offer sacrifices.

When Jesus entered the Court of the Gentiles, He was furious to see people buying and selling in the temple. Animal sacrifices were required for participation in the temple, since God declared that all Jewish men must appear three times before the Lord each year, and they must not appear empty-handed. (See Deut. 16:16.) For many worshipers traveling from all over the Roman Empire to take part in Passover, it was easier to purchase unblemished animals for sacrificing in the Court of the Gentiles. There, they also exchanged foreign currency for the temple taxes and offerings. So why was Jesus angry at the people?

The merchants buying and selling in the temple were treating the temple as a market or bazaar, not like the house of prayer for all nations that God had intended for it to be. (See Isa. 56:7.) The moneychangers’ prices were so exorbitant, they were practically robbing the people. (Mark 11:17) On top of that, people were using the temple courts as a shortcut to get to their businesses. The Gentiles who wished to worship God in peace were surrounded by greed and extortion.

After Jesus threw out the merchants and moneychangers, the chief priests and the scribes wanted to destroy Him. (Luke 19:47) Jesus was angry that people were misusing the temple, the place people could go to meet with God.

Today, Christians do not go to a temple to meet with God or to offer sacrifices for sin. Jesus died on the cross as the final payment for sin, and God’s Spirit lives in us!

Activity: Guide your family to discuss times when they were angry for the wrong reasons. Ask them how they could have responded differently. Read Matthew 21:12-17 together. Jesus was angry for the right reasons. People were sinning by misusing the temple, which was the place people could go to meet with God. Today, we don’t have to go to a temple to meet with God because God’s Spirit lives in all who trust in Jesus as Lord and Savior.

 

Posted by Erin Krotz with

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